shade gardening

Plants for Dry Shade

Plants for Dry Shade

Way up here in the land of tall conifers, dry shade is a common gardening challenge. I’ve had success with the following plants in the shade of conifers, and they also work well in deciduous woodlands or in the dry rain shadow of north-facing buildings and garden walls. As with any new plantings, they will require summer water for several dry seasons until they have established a root system capable of competing with existing tree roots.

Hardy Fuchsias for Summer and Fall Blooms

Hardy Fuchsias for Summer and Fall Blooms

When planting for late-summer blooms, look no further than the hardy Fuchsia. For those with mixed garden conditions - some sun, some shade, some of everything in between - hardy Fuchsias are excellent for providing a continual source of color from late June until the first frosts of late October and November.

Fifty Shades of... Well, Shade

Fifty Shades of... Well, Shade

Your Attention Please: the Puget Sound region has shady areas. We Northwesterners want to garden, shade or no shade. We try to garden under lots of really big trees, on the north sides of the ever-increasing quantities of tall buildings, and in the shadows of a host of other structures.

Mothering a Moth

Mothering a Moth

Greetings from the coop! Spring is here and so are the chicks! They were hatched on March 19th, so they are barely two and a half weeks old. They arrived at the very end of March and seem to be settling in just fine. They are beyond adorable.  ... I fed it Fuchsias from my garden. I did this for several days until I realized it had stopped feeding and had burrowed under the moss. It was pupating! A large brown chrysalis lay in the leaf debris. I kept it out on a sheltered porch during most of the winter, bringing it indoors during harder freezes, then back out for the remainder of the winter.